Postperformance Mementos

Reverse engineering J Dilla beats into a hybrid live/looped context.

Amazing look inside the digital effects used to create, well, plain old reality in The Wolf of Wall St.

hiphoptranscriptions:

Rapper: MF DOOM; Song: “Figaro”; Year: 2004; Time Mark: 0:29; Artist: Madvillain; Album: Madvillainy.  “Figaro”

hiphoptranscriptions:

Rapper: MF DOOM; Song: “Figaro”; Year: 2004; Time Mark: 0:29; Artist: Madvillain; Album: Madvillainy.  
“Figaro”

Using wood instead of vinyl for a record

analogisdigital:

BEND: A Circuit Bending Documentary 

Radu Lupu and artificial scarcity

A nice New Yorker post on pianist Radu Lupu that contains this gem, an example of a deliberate aesthetic/political choice not to record (which naturally drives up the value of seeing him perform in person): 

There’s another facet to the excitement of a Lupu concert: he no longer records. You know that when you hear him play, you will never hear the piece like this again, especially as Lupu, of late, seems to play a lot of repertoire that he has never recorded—Janáček, Debussy, Franck.

He [Godard] understood that the modernism of the cinema was based in the archeology of its history—and that devotion to the history of the cinema was a blend of passive rapture and actively audacious manipulation. One of his great insights—dating from the nineteen-seventies—is that home video would be the basis for a newly analytical understanding of film history, because it would allow for the easy copying of clips and their manipulation via video editing with such techniques as slow motion, freeze-frame, and superimpositions of other images and text); he made the work, “Histoire(s) du Cinéma,” that proved the point. Every video essay that turns up online owes him a debt of gratitude.
Today marks the 30th anniversary of a musical format many of us grew up with: the compact disc.

analogisdigital:

Baby Got Back

Glenn Gould orchestrates a soundscape within a take. Wonderful vision of the recording process at work, providing the listener with a sense of some of the aspects they never realize are ever-present in today’s recordings (if one thinks of microphones like ears, Gould slowly adds and changes several ears to completely shift the soundscape within this piece).